How it works

The Cochlear Hybrid™ System has a unique design that seamlessly integrated the advantages of cochlear implant and hearing aid technology.

Woman working in a lab

For patients with severe to profound hearing loss in the high frequencies, even the most powerful hearing aids, well fitted, may not provide an effective solution.

Studies show that conventional acoustic amplification is often ineffective for transmitting speech sounds to those with a severe to profound high frequency hearing loss, and provides minimal benefit for speech understanding.1,2,3

The Cochlear Hybrid™ System has a unique design that seamlessly integrated the advantages of cochlear implant and hearing aid technology.

The comprehensive system includes:

  • Nucleus® Hybrid™ L24 implant (also referred to as CI24REH)
  • Freedom® Hybrid™ Sound Processor with acoustic component
Image of hybrid sound processor with acoustic component and hybrid implant

Function of the cochlea with Hybrid system

The Hybrid acoustic component amplifies sound, stimulating the low frequency hair cells deep inside the cochlea, and improving the perception of low frequency sounds in the brain. The Hybrid implant directly stimulates the high frequency hearing cells bypassing the damaged hair cells and creates the perception of high frequency sound in the brain.

Demonstration with an image of how it works hearing with hybrid system

 

Diagram of cochlea function when stimulated with the hybrid system

 

Disclaimer

Please seek advice from your health professional about treatments for hearing loss. Outcomes may vary, and your health professional will advise you about the factors which could affect your outcome. Always read the instructions for use. Not all products are available in all countries. Please contact your local Cochlear representative for product information.

Footnotes

  1. Ching, T., Dillon, H., & Byrne, D. (1998) Speech recognition of hearing-impaired listeners: Predictions from audibility and the limited role of high-frequency amplification, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103,1128-1140.
  2. Hogan, C., & Turner, C.W. (1998) High Frequency Audibility: benefits for hearing impaired-impaired listeners, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104, 432-441.
  3. Turner, C.W. & Cummings, K.J. (1999). Speech Audibility for listeners with high-frequency hearing loss. American Journal of Audiology, 8, 47-56.