HOPE words

An effective tool to practice listening and spoken language at home.

Rehabilitation resources - Hope words

Parents are instructed to encourage their children

Encourage your child to listen to and learn spoken language by using the 5 E’s to make this an auditory process that is enjoyable as you and your child play with the app together.

  1. Expose: say the word as your child listens to help your child develop an auditory foundation.
  2. Expect: encourage your child to say the word to practice talking.
  3. Experience: let your child tap on the picture to see the animation.
  4. Expand: talk about the object in the picture to expand your child's language. (See the next page, "Interact", for more ideas on what to talk about.)
  5. Express: expect your child to use the word spontaneously when playing with the app, toys, objects and in daily life.

 

Interact with your child

Interact with your child and talk about the pictures as they are using HOPE words. Carry over your discussion into daily life and real objects and relate it to your child's experiences.

Using the picture and printed word "table" as an example, you might talk about:

  • Category name: furniture
  • Different kinds: dining, kitchen, end table, craft, doll house, tea party, picnic, computer
  • Size: small, little, tiny, medium, average, large, huge
  • Shape: circle, square, rectangle, oval
  • Color: brown, beige, white, gray, black, red
  • Texture or how it feels: hard, smooth, flat
  • Different parts: top, legs, edge, corner
  • When you use it: eating, drinking, working, drawing, writing
  • What goes with it: utensils, chairs, tablecloth, homework
  • What it’s made of: wood, metal, plastic
  • How you take care of it: wash, wipe, dust, clean, set
  • Where you find it: kitchen, dining room, living room, restaurant, playground, school, office
  • How it is the same as or different from something else:
    • Same: chair and table are both furniture; chair and table go together
    • Different: sit on a chair but sit at a table; the chair is smaller than the table; we move the chair but we don't easily/often move the table.
  • How it is the same as or different from your own: "This one is bigger", "Ours is in the kitchen"

To continue learning after the app is put away:

  • Read a story about it (use the internet to search for children’s books about any HOPE Word):
    • Under the table by Marisabina Russo
    • Good table manners for little monkeys by Susie Lee Jin
    • Anna’s table by Eva Bunting
  • Sing it in a song
  • Talk about it often

 

Professionals are instructed to encourage parents to interact with their children

Encourage parents to interact with their child and talk about the pictures as they are using HOPE words. Making connections between the pictured objects and those in the child’s daily life will enrich the learning process.

Using the picture and printed word "candy" as an example, parents might talk about:

  • Category name: food, dessert
  • Different kinds: lollipop, candy bar, taffy, chocolate, gum
  • Size: small, little, tiny, medium, average, large, huge
  • Shape: circle, square, rectangle, stick
  • Color: brown, red, white, purple, green, yellow
  • Texture or how it feels: hard, smooth, sticky, gooey, crunchy
  • When you eat it: after dinner, for a treat, when you are allowed
  • What goes with it: wrapper, bag, box, stick
  • What it’s made of: sugar, chocolate, nuts, caramel, peanut butter
  • Where you find it: candy store, grocery store, bottom of a purse
  • How it is the same as or different from something else:
    • Same: candy and cake are both sweet, both are desserts
    • Different: candy is served in small bites or bars, cake is served in slices; cake is made with flour and frosting, candy is mostly sugar
  • How it is the same as or different from the kind you're used to: "That is hard candy, I like soft chocolate", "The kind I have is in a box, this one is wrapped"

To further encourage carry-over, provide extension materials/resources for new words:

  • Children's literature (use the internet to search for children’s books about any HOPE Word):
    • Mookie and the candy store by Judith Kristen
    • Harriet's halloween candy by Nancy L. Carlson
    • Candy 1 to 20 by Patty Abrams
  • Finger plays and Songs:
    • "Bubblegum, bubblegum in a dish"
    • "Big rock candy mountain"
    • "The candy man"
  • Games: Candyland

 

Share strategies for encouraging auditory learning

Share strategies for successful use of home carryover tools like HOPE words. Work with parents to help them learn to:

  • Present vocabulary through listening first whenever possible.
  • Highlight the target vocabulary word in phrases and sentences.
  • Pause briefly after saying a new word or allowing their child to tap the picture/hear the word. This "wait time" allows the child a chance to process the information they hear.
  • Expand single words into longer phrases and sentences. Using "candy" as an example: "Candy – Boy that candy looks yummy!"
  • Use an expectant look to encourage their child to join into the conversation.
  • Be creative! Show parents different ways to use the app as their child’s language grows:
    • Guessing Game: hold the iPad facing away from the child and describe the pictured object to the child for him or her to guess.
    • Memory Game: challenge the child to recall 2, 3 or 4 of the last pictures viewed.
    • Story Game: make up a short story using one or more words from the group you’ve been looking at.
    • Rhyme Words: make up fun jingles using words that rhyme (i.e. Candy is dandy. Mandy likes candy, Randy eats candy and Sandy shares candy.)